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International Development Middle East Policy & Politics Regional Topical

Why Iraq’s Consociation Has Become a Driver for Chronic Instability

Maria Fantappie is a special advisor at the Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue. Theorists of consociation argue that it is the best kind of democracy a plural society can expect: a power-sharing formula that accommodates leaders representing different segments of the population, thus preventing one group from dominating the others. As Saddam Hussein fell in 2003, […]

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Africa Asia Pacific Middle East North America Policy & Politics Regional Security & Conflict Topical

Countering Terror in Transition: A Typology of Terrorist Organization Successors and their Vulnerabilities

Dr. Tricia Bacon is an Associate Professor at the School of Public Affairs at American University. Dr. Elizabeth Grimm is an Associate Professor of Teaching in the Security Studies Program at Georgetown University. One of the singular challenges for a terrorist organization is how to transition to another leader after the founder’s death. For the […]

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Europe Middle East Policy & Politics Regional Security & Conflict Topical

Russia is Lying About its AI Capabilities: How Russia is Using Emerging Technologies to Hide Human Rights Violations

Lauren Kahn is a research fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. Since Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine began, Russian President Vladimir Putin’s military forces have flouted international norms and international humanitarian law. Russian forces in Ukraine have looted, mistreated prisoners of war, forcibly moved Ukrainians to Russia, and targeted civilians. It is no surprise, […]

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Asia Pacific Governance & Law Middle East Policy & Politics Security & Conflict

Towards an ASEAN Model for Cooperation in Central Asia

ASEAN provides a working framework for Central Asian states to engage in comprehensive regional cooperation to neutralize internal conflicts and survive great power competition. A New Saigon After years of fighting a rural insurgency, a rushed American withdrawal leads to the collapse of a Washington-backed government and the desperate, mass evacuation of former American allies. […]

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Civil Society Middle East Security & Conflict

Women in Afghanistan: The Forgotten Objective

The US decision to focus on civil rights and institutions as a part of an overall counter-insurgency strategy was not a mistake. The suggestion that the United States has no obligation to address women’s rights in the negotiation process because “such rights have never existed in most of Afghanistan” is an insult to the thousands of women that have sacrificed for the American ideals of freedom and equality pushed by the Allies since 2001.

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Africa Civil Society Middle East Security & Conflict

The Second Wave?

It is clear that while the momentum of the Arab Uprisings of 2011 had been arrested – and, in Egypt, Syria, and Bahrain, reversed or crushed – the root causes that brought them about still exist and have, in most states, not been addressed and are “burning embers under the ashes.”

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Book Reviews Civil Society Middle East

How Exceptional is Jordan?

Hardly a year goes by without learned assessments that under the pressure of internal and regional challenges, the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan’s luck may run out. However, this “weak man” of the Middle East continues to be one of the region’s islands of relative stability.

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Governance & Law International Development Middle East North America Policy & Politics

Why U.S. Foreign Aid Should Not Be Conditioned on United Nations General Assembly Voting Patterns

Tying U.S. aid to individual recipient countries’ voting patterns in the UNGA … would ultimately deprive the United States of a great tool with which it has so uniquely built its greatness around the world and the world around it: foreign aid.

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Middle East Policy & Politics Security & Conflict

ISIS Is Not al-Qaeda: We Need a Different Strategy

Author Nicole A. Softness argues that ISIS is primarily, and potentially exclusively, prioritizing its territorial claims. She argues that this warrants a new strategy from the US-led counterterrorism alliance: one that treats ISIS like a violent revolutionary movement (more akin to the French and Communist Revolutions), and as a potentially legitimate state, rather than a scattered and decentralized ideological network.

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Europe Middle East Policy & Politics Security & Conflict

Turkey and NATO are better together

Author Ali Cinar argues that leaders from both Turkey and NATO should reaffirm their mutual strategic commitments, as cooperation is imperative to advancing the interests of leaders in Turkey and other NATO partner countries, such as effectively fighting ISIS and managing other threats emanating from the Middle East.