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Civil Society Middle East Security & Conflict

Women in Afghanistan: The Forgotten Objective

The US decision to focus on civil rights and institutions as a part of an overall counter-insurgency strategy was not a mistake. The suggestion that the United States has no obligation to address women’s rights in the negotiation process because “such rights have never existed in most of Afghanistan” is an insult to the thousands of women that have sacrificed for the American ideals of freedom and equality pushed by the Allies since 2001.

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Africa Civil Society Middle East Security & Conflict

The Second Wave?

It is clear that while the momentum of the Arab Uprisings of 2011 had been arrested – and, in Egypt, Syria, and Bahrain, reversed or crushed – the root causes that brought them about still exist and have, in most states, not been addressed and are “burning embers under the ashes.”

Categories
Book Reviews Civil Society Middle East

How Exceptional is Jordan?

Hardly a year goes by without learned assessments that under the pressure of internal and regional challenges, the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan’s luck may run out. However, this “weak man” of the Middle East continues to be one of the region’s islands of relative stability.

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Governance & Law International Development Middle East North America Policy & Politics

Why U.S. Foreign Aid Should Not Be Conditioned on United Nations General Assembly Voting Patterns

Tying U.S. aid to individual recipient countries’ voting patterns in the UNGA … would ultimately deprive the United States of a great tool with which it has so uniquely built its greatness around the world and the world around it: foreign aid.

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Middle East Policy & Politics Security & Conflict

ISIS Is Not al-Qaeda: We Need a Different Strategy

Author Nicole A. Softness argues that ISIS is primarily, and potentially exclusively, prioritizing its territorial claims. She argues that this warrants a new strategy from the US-led counterterrorism alliance: one that treats ISIS like a violent revolutionary movement (more akin to the French and Communist Revolutions), and as a potentially legitimate state, rather than a scattered and decentralized ideological network.

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Europe Middle East Policy & Politics Security & Conflict

Turkey and NATO are better together

Author Ali Cinar argues that leaders from both Turkey and NATO should reaffirm their mutual strategic commitments, as cooperation is imperative to advancing the interests of leaders in Turkey and other NATO partner countries, such as effectively fighting ISIS and managing other threats emanating from the Middle East.

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Asia Pacific Governance & Law Middle East Policy & Politics Security & Conflict

A Road to Peace in West Asia

Author Mishaal Al Gergawi illustrates a broad overview of the political challenges facing the Middle East, asserting that the domestic drivers of such challenges are accentuated by sectarianism. He argues that a resolution to Saudi-Iranian geopolitical competition would greatly mitigate conflicts throughout the region, and describes the contours of a potential settlement between these powers.

Categories
Civil Society Economics Europe Middle East

Labor Market Reform in France would Help Ease Muslim – non-Muslim Tension

Author Adam Millsap asserts that the liberalization of labor markets in France and other European countries would address concerns of immigrant assimilation by providing more economic opportunity for immigrants, which would make it easier for them to adjust to their new surroundings. He concludes that labor market liberalization could also provide long-term economic prosperity for all in France.

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Civil Society Governance & Law Middle East

Tribalism in Transition: Iraq’s Sunni Tribes Before, During and After the Islamic State – Part II

In this two-part series, author Alex Simon discusses the evolution and increasingly fragmented nature of Sunni tribalism in Iraq from the era of Ottoman occupation through the rise of the so-called Islamic State, and its implications for the future of the Iraqi polity.

Categories
Civil Society Governance & Law Middle East

Tribalism in Transition: Iraq’s Sunni Tribes Before, During and After the Islamic State – Part I

In this two-part series, author Alex Simon discusses the evolution and increasingly fragmented nature of Sunni tribalism in Iraq from the era of Ottoman occupation through the rise of the so-called Islamic State, and its implications for the future of the Iraqi polity.