Categories
Book Reviews Governance & Law Security & Conflict

The Hacker and the State by Ben Buchanan

Review of Buchanan, Ben. The Hacker and the State: Cyber Attacks and the New Normal of Geopolitics (Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 2020) Juniper Networks, a Silicon Valley company that makes networking products, made headlines in early June. Sixteen members of Congress sent a letter to the company’s CEO wanting to know why some of the […]

Categories
Book Reviews Europe Security & Conflict

The Future of British Foreign Policy: Security and Diplomacy in a World After Brexit

Review of Hill, Christopher. The Future of British Foreign Policy: Security and Diplomacy in a World After Brexit (Cambridge, Polity Press, 2019) On January 31, 2020, the United Kingdom formally left the European Union. For most observers, Brexit Day meant the conclusion of a long drawn out negotiation process lasting for more than three-and-a-half years […]

Categories
Editors' Updates Special Content

SAIS Review’s Newest Issue ‘Nuclear Weapons in the 21st Century’ Available For Free Online

Volume 39, Issue 2 of the SAIS Review of International Affairs seeks to address the topic of nuclear weapons and their role in the 21st century. To that end, the featured essays spotlight some of the most pressing issues affecting nuclear weapons and shaping their future impact on strategy and the world more generally.

Categories
Energy & Environment Interviews Special Content

The SAIS Review Interview with His Excellency Dr. Thani bin Ahmed Al Zeyoudi

His Excellency Dr. Thani bin Ahmed Al Zeyoudi is the Minister of Climate Change and Environment for the United Arab Emirates

Categories
Book Reviews Governance & Law North America

On The Taming of Free Speech

In the 1920s, the ACLU brought civil liberties to the forefront of political discussion. Despite the Bill of Rights being in place, the inability of the judiciary to act on civil liberties caused constraints on the relationship between the state and its citizens. As a result, civil liberties had limited effects on society. As an example of the shifts in civil liberties, Weinrib focuses on the creation of the ACLU as an offshoot of the American Union Against Militarism (AUAM) with an agenda to press the U.S. government for the expansion of civil liberties during WWI. In doing so, the author illustrates the conflict between citizens and the state over civil liberties and the aim of the AUAM to create a balance between social interests and to promote civil liberties.

Categories
Economics Editors' Updates Events

Book Launch: “Social Finance: Shadow Banking During the Global Financial Crisis” by Neil Shenai

Shenai presented his conventions-based theory of financial crises, and numerous current and former students participated in a wide-ranging discussion on the advantages of Shenai’s model, the overall state of academic research on financial markets, and policy implications of Shenai’s theory on financial regulation and managing risks in the global economy.

Categories
Book Reviews Civil Society Policy & Politics

The Future of Diplomacy and the Hand of Social Media

Can governments eventually learn to better utilize and appreciate the growing influence of social media? The answer is not clear, and the future of diplomacy is yet to be written.

Categories
Book Reviews Civil Society Middle East

How Exceptional is Jordan?

Hardly a year goes by without learned assessments that under the pressure of internal and regional challenges, the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan’s luck may run out. However, this “weak man” of the Middle East continues to be one of the region’s islands of relative stability.

Categories
Editors' Updates Events

Roundtable Discussion: The State of the Fourth Estate

Join the Editorial Board of The SAIS Review of International Affairs for a roundtable lunch and discussion on the role of the media in international affairs with three expert contributors to SAIS Review’s Fall 2018 issue, The State of the Fourth Estate. 

Categories
Asia Pacific Book Reviews Security & Conflict

Assessing American Statecraft in Asia

The United States will not tolerate any other power establishing “exclusive hegemonic control” over Asia or the Pacific, according to renowned Asia scholar Michael Green. In a magisterial work, Green argues persuasively that this anti-hegemonic impulse has been the central driver of American grand strategy toward the Asia-Pacific for over two centuries.